Fallout 76’s Trailer Song Now Available To Buy With Money Going To Charity

What do you think?

The first trailer for Bethesda’s much-anticipated Fallout 76 featured a cover of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” A stirring rendition of the classic, done by the band Copilot, the song was thematic fit. The lyrics mention West Virginia, which is Fallout 76’s setting. You can now buy the song on iTunes, and what’s even better is that 100 percent of proceeds from the 99-cent song go to Habitat for Humanity.

Head to iTunes here to buy the song for yourself.

Habitat for Humanity is a charity that that supports the creation of improvement of houses for people who need them. The theme of Fallout 76 is rebuilding America, and as it happens, Habitat for Humanity was founded in…’76.

Copilot’s “Country Roads” launched on iTunes on July 4. Before now, we did not know for sure which band or artist was behind the track.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Unlike previous entries in the acclaimed RPG series, Fallout 76 is an always-online, multiplayer-focused game, so it will be interesting to see how the community responds. A beta will be held prior to launch, and you can guarantee yourself a spot by pre-ordering.

Fallout 76’s Trailer Song Now Available To Buy With Money Going To Charity

What do you think?

The first trailer for Bethesda’s much-anticipated Fallout 76 featured a cover of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” A stirring rendition of the classic, done by the band Copilot, the song was thematic fit. The lyrics mention West Virginia, which is Fallout 76’s setting. You can now buy the song on iTunes, and what’s even better is that 100 percent of proceeds from the 99-cent song go to Habitat for Humanity.

Head to iTunes here to buy the song for yourself.

Habitat for Humanity is a charity that that supports the creation of improvement of houses for people who need them. The theme of Fallout 76 is rebuilding America, and as it happens, Habitat for Humanity was founded in…’76.

Copilot’s “Country Roads” launched on iTunes on July 4. Before now, we did not know for sure which band or artist was behind the track.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Unlike previous entries in the acclaimed RPG series, Fallout 76 is an always-online, multiplayer-focused game, so it will be interesting to see how the community responds. A beta will be held prior to launch, and you can guarantee yourself a spot by pre-ordering.

Fallout 76’s Trailer Song Now Available To Buy With Money Going To Charity

What do you think?

The first trailer for Bethesda’s much-anticipated Fallout 76 featured a cover of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” A stirring rendition of the classic, done by the band Copilot, the song was thematic fit. The lyrics mention West Virginia, which is Fallout 76’s setting. You can now buy the song on iTunes, and what’s even better is that 100 percent of proceeds from the 99-cent song go to Habitat for Humanity.

Head to iTunes here to buy the song for yourself.

Habitat for Humanity is a charity that that supports the creation of improvement of houses for people who need them. The theme of Fallout 76 is rebuilding America, and as it happens, Habitat for Humanity was founded in…’76.

Copilot’s “Country Roads” launched on iTunes on July 4. Before now, we did not know for sure which band or artist was behind the track.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Unlike previous entries in the acclaimed RPG series, Fallout 76 is an always-online, multiplayer-focused game, so it will be interesting to see how the community responds. A beta will be held prior to launch, and you can guarantee yourself a spot by pre-ordering.

Fallout 76’s Trailer Song Now Available To Buy With Money Going To Charity

What do you think?

The first trailer for Bethesda’s much-anticipated Fallout 76 featured a cover of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” A stirring rendition of the classic, done by the band Copilot, the song was thematic fit. The lyrics mention West Virginia, which is Fallout 76’s setting. You can now buy the song on iTunes, and what’s even better is that 100 percent of proceeds from the 99-cent song go to Habitat for Humanity.

Head to iTunes here to buy the song for yourself.

Habitat for Humanity is a charity that that supports the creation of improvement of houses for people who need them. The theme of Fallout 76 is rebuilding America, and as it happens, Habitat for Humanity was founded in…’76.

Copilot’s “Country Roads” launched on iTunes on July 4. Before now, we did not know for sure which band or artist was behind the track.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Unlike previous entries in the acclaimed RPG series, Fallout 76 is an always-online, multiplayer-focused game, so it will be interesting to see how the community responds. A beta will be held prior to launch, and you can guarantee yourself a spot by pre-ordering.

Fallout 76’s Trailer Song Now Available To Buy With Money Going To Charity

What do you think?

The first trailer for Bethesda’s much-anticipated Fallout 76 featured a cover of John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads.” A stirring rendition of the classic, done by the band Copilot, the song was thematic fit. The lyrics mention West Virginia, which is Fallout 76’s setting. You can now buy the song on iTunes, and what’s even better is that 100 percent of proceeds from the 99-cent song go to Habitat for Humanity.

Head to iTunes here to buy the song for yourself.

Habitat for Humanity is a charity that that supports the creation of improvement of houses for people who need them. The theme of Fallout 76 is rebuilding America, and as it happens, Habitat for Humanity was founded in…’76.

Copilot’s “Country Roads” launched on iTunes on July 4. Before now, we did not know for sure which band or artist was behind the track.

Fallout 76 launches on November 14 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Unlike previous entries in the acclaimed RPG series, Fallout 76 is an always-online, multiplayer-focused game, so it will be interesting to see how the community responds. A beta will be held prior to launch, and you can guarantee yourself a spot by pre-ordering.

Sweaty Men: Madden 19 To Have Improvements To Perspiration Graphics

What do you think?

EA Sports has outlined some of the improvements being made to Madden NFL 19‘s graphics, and one area of focus this year is on player sweat. This is being done as part of EA’s effort to make players look “as real as possible” in gameplay scenarios. Thanks to high-definition cameras, you see player sweat all the time on NFL TV broadcasts, but capturing this sweat has been somewhat lacking in the Madden games of late. It’s a good move for Madden 19 to get with the program, as other sports games such as NBA 2K have been making strides in the perspiration department for years now.

EA provided an example of how player sweat looks in Madden 19 with an image of New York Giants standout WR Odell Beckham Jr. Have a look for yourself:

No Caption Provided

Last year’s Madden 18 was the first title in the series to run on EA’s own Frostbite Engine, and that game looked very good. Madden 19 looks like it will go even further. Beyond the new player sweat, EA said it focused on making skin tones and general player likenesses look more true to life. Additionally, EA says it has made advancements towards the amount of detail around the skin and eyes in general for player likenesses in Madden 19.

What’s more, there are new player models in Madden 19 that aim to more closely match the real-world players they are based on. “We added new player models to Madden 19 that get us closer than we have ever been to the actual representation of the players currently on the field this year in the NFL,” EA said. “This helps Madden deliver an unseen sense of realism to the franchise.”

Another area of visual improvement for Madden 19 comes in the form of lighting. Specifics are unclear at this stage, but EA said it has tweaked the lighting to “make things pop and help bring a next-level realism…” Here is an example of what that looks like:

No Caption Provided

Madden 19 launches in August for Xbox One and PlayStation 4, while a PC edition is also coming for the first time in a decade. The game is not coming to Nintendo Switch, however. In other Madden news, EA Sports told us to that Madden 19 will not address the NFL’s controversial new kneeling policy.

We Happy Few Ban In Australia Overturned, And It Won’t Be Modified Or Censored

What do you think?

Back in May, Australia’s Classification Board announced that the BioShock-inspired adventure game We Happy Few was refused classification in the country. That meant it was effectively banned, which is a big bummer for Australians hoping to play the game. At the time, developer Compulsion Games said it was upset and frustrated by the decision, adding that it planned to work with the classification board to have the decision overturned.

That has now happened, with a three-person panel at the Classification Review Board unanimously stating that We Happy Few will be classified R18+ in Australia. That is Australia’s highest rating level, with the official word being that “the content is high in impact,” and specifically restricted to adults. Retailers may ask consumers to provide a proof of age document to purchase R18+ games in Australia.

We Happy Few’s R18+ rating will come with a content description noting that the game has “fantasy violence and interactive drug use.” The drug use appears to have been the sticking point in the Board’s original decision to refuse the game for classification. In its original ruling, the Board specifically mentioned the in-game drug, Joy, which players take throughout the game. In some parts of the game, taking the drug reduces the difficulty and makes the game appear more colourful and vibrant. The Board said “the game’s drug-use mechanic making game progression less difficult constitutes an incentive or reward for drug-use” and was therefore refused classification.

In its decision to overturn the ban, the Board said it determined We Happy Few’s drug use elements were actually “no greater than high.” The Board said it considered Australia’s Classification Act 1995, the National Classification Scheme, the National Classification Code, and the Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games when making its decision to give We Happy Few a classification.

Bethesda’s Fallout 3 was banned in Australia due to its depiction of drug use as well.

We Happy Few is published by Borderlands studio Gearbox, which is the company that asked the Board to reconsider its ruling. Compulsion Games said in its own statement that it went through a “great deal of effort” to get the decision overturned. Another big part of this announcement is that Compulsion Games was not forced to modify We Happy Few to meet the Classification Board’s guidelines. That’s a big deal, as other big-name games like Call of Duty: WWII, Saints Row IV, and South Park: The Stick of Truth were all edited to make it through the classification process in Australia.

“We are extremely pleased with the decision of the board and excited that our Australian fans and new players will be able to experience We Happy Few without modification,” Compulsion Games said in a statement. “We want to thank everybody who got involved in the discussion, contacted the board and sent us countless messages of support. Your involvement made a huge difference.”

Compulsion producer Sam Abbott told Kotaku that the Board’s original decision to refuse We Happy Few for classification made sense based on the information it had to go on at time. He added that the studio could have done more to make sure it provided the right context for the drug-related scenarios in the game when submitting it for classification. Abbot went on to thank publisher Gearbox for its help with the appeal process as it relates to the advice it gave Compulsion and the money it provided for the effort to overturn the decision.

GameSpot has reached out to Compulsion in an attempt to get more details about this situation. Keep checking back for more.

We Happy Few has been announced for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. It was already playable on PC (and Xbox One) through Early Access, but in January when the game was delayed to summer 2018, Compulsion removed the ability to pre-buy the game.

The game is set in an alternate-history version of 1960s England in the fictional town of Wellington Wells. Players take on the role of characters who refuse to take their mind-altering happy pills and must find a way to escape from the town without being caught by its citizens.

We Happy Few Ban In Australia Overturned, And It Won’t Be Modified Or Censored

What do you think?

Back in May, Australia’s Classification Board announced that the BioShock-inspired adventure game We Happy Few was refused classification in the country. That meant it was effectively banned, which is a big bummer for Australians hoping to play the game. At the time, developer Compulsion Games said it was upset and frustrated by the decision, adding that it planned to work with the classification board to have the decision overturned.

That has now happened, with a three-person panel at the Classification Review Board unanimously stating that We Happy Few will be classified R18+ in Australia. That is Australia’s highest rating level, with the official word being that “the content is high in impact,” and specifically restricted to adults. Retailers may ask consumers to provide a proof of age document to purchase R18+ games in Australia.

We Happy Few’s R18+ rating will come with a content description noting that the game has “fantasy violence and interactive drug use.” The drug use appears to have been the sticking point in the Board’s original decision to refuse the game for classification. In its original ruling, the Board specifically mentioned the in-game drug, Joy, which players take throughout the game. In some parts of the game, taking the drug reduces the difficulty and makes the game appear more colourful and vibrant. The Board said “the game’s drug-use mechanic making game progression less difficult constitutes an incentive or reward for drug-use” and was therefore refused classification.

In its decision to overturn the ban, the Board said it determined We Happy Few’s drug use elements were actually “no greater than high.” The Board said it considered Australia’s Classification Act 1995, the National Classification Scheme, the National Classification Code, and the Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games when making its decision to give We Happy Few a classification.

Bethesda’s Fallout 3 was banned in Australia due to its depiction of drug use as well.

We Happy Few is published by Borderlands studio Gearbox, which is the company that asked the Board to reconsider its ruling. Compulsion Games said in its own statement that it went through a “great deal of effort” to get the decision overturned. Another big part of this announcement is that Compulsion Games was not forced to modify We Happy Few to meet the Classification Board’s guidelines. That’s a big deal, as other big-name games like Call of Duty: WWII, Saints Row IV, and South Park: The Stick of Truth were all edited to make it through the classification process in Australia.

“We are extremely pleased with the decision of the board and excited that our Australian fans and new players will be able to experience We Happy Few without modification,” Compulsion Games said in a statement. “We want to thank everybody who got involved in the discussion, contacted the board and sent us countless messages of support. Your involvement made a huge difference.”

Compulsion producer Sam Abbott told Kotaku that the Board’s original decision to refuse We Happy Few for classification made sense based on the information it had to go on at time. He added that the studio could have done more to make sure it provided the right context for the drug-related scenarios in the game when submitting it for classification. Abbot went on to thank publisher Gearbox for its help with the appeal process as it relates to the advice it gave Compulsion and the money it provided for the effort to overturn the decision.

GameSpot has reached out to Compulsion in an attempt to get more details about this situation. Keep checking back for more.

We Happy Few has been announced for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. It was already playable on PC (and Xbox One) through Early Access, but in January when the game was delayed to summer 2018, Compulsion removed the ability to pre-buy the game.

The game is set in an alternate-history version of 1960s England in the fictional town of Wellington Wells. Players take on the role of characters who refuse to take their mind-altering happy pills and must find a way to escape from the town without being caught by its citizens.

We Happy Few Ban In Australia Overturned, And It Won’t Be Modified Or Censored

What do you think?

Back in May, Australia’s Classification Board announced that the BioShock-inspired adventure game We Happy Few was refused classification in the country. That meant it was effectively banned, which is a big bummer for Australians hoping to play the game. At the time, developer Compulsion Games said it was upset and frustrated by the decision, adding that it planned to work with the classification board to have the decision overturned.

That has now happened, with a three-person panel at the Classification Review Board unanimously stating that We Happy Few will be classified R18+ in Australia. That is Australia’s highest rating level, with the official word being that “the content is high in impact,” and specifically restricted to adults. Retailers may ask consumers to provide a proof of age document to purchase R18+ games in Australia.

We Happy Few’s R18+ rating will come with a content description noting that the game has “fantasy violence and interactive drug use.” The drug use appears to have been the sticking point in the Board’s original decision to refuse the game for classification. In its original ruling, the Board specifically mentioned the in-game drug, Joy, which players take throughout the game. In some parts of the game, taking the drug reduces the difficulty and makes the game appear more colourful and vibrant. The Board said “the game’s drug-use mechanic making game progression less difficult constitutes an incentive or reward for drug-use” and was therefore refused classification.

In its decision to overturn the ban, the Board said it determined We Happy Few’s drug use elements were actually “no greater than high.” The Board said it considered Australia’s Classification Act 1995, the National Classification Scheme, the National Classification Code, and the Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games when making its decision to give We Happy Few a classification.

Bethesda’s Fallout 3 was banned in Australia due to its depiction of drug use as well.

We Happy Few is published by Borderlands studio Gearbox, which is the company that asked the Board to reconsider its ruling. Compulsion Games said in its own statement that it went through a “great deal of effort” to get the decision overturned. Another big part of this announcement is that Compulsion Games was not forced to modify We Happy Few to meet the Classification Board’s guidelines. That’s a big deal, as other big-name games like Call of Duty: WWII, Saints Row IV, and South Park: The Stick of Truth were all edited to make it through the classification process in Australia.

“We are extremely pleased with the decision of the board and excited that our Australian fans and new players will be able to experience We Happy Few without modification,” Compulsion Games said in a statement. “We want to thank everybody who got involved in the discussion, contacted the board and sent us countless messages of support. Your involvement made a huge difference.”

Compulsion producer Sam Abbott told Kotaku that the Board’s original decision to refuse We Happy Few for classification made sense based on the information it had to go on at time. He added that the studio could have done more to make sure it provided the right context for the drug-related scenarios in the game when submitting it for classification. Abbot went on to thank publisher Gearbox for its help with the appeal process as it relates to the advice it gave Compulsion and the money it provided for the effort to overturn the decision.

GameSpot has reached out to Compulsion in an attempt to get more details about this situation. Keep checking back for more.

We Happy Few has been announced for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. It was already playable on PC (and Xbox One) through Early Access, but in January when the game was delayed to summer 2018, Compulsion removed the ability to pre-buy the game.

The game is set in an alternate-history version of 1960s England in the fictional town of Wellington Wells. Players take on the role of characters who refuse to take their mind-altering happy pills and must find a way to escape from the town without being caught by its citizens.

We Happy Few Ban In Australia Overturned, And It Won’t Be Modified Or Censored

What do you think?

Back in May, Australia’s Classification Board announced that the BioShock-inspired adventure game We Happy Few was refused classification in the country. That meant it was effectively banned, which is a big bummer for Australians hoping to play the game. At the time, developer Compulsion Games said it was upset and frustrated by the decision, adding that it planned to work with the classification board to have the decision overturned.

That has now happened, with a three-person panel at the Classification Review Board unanimously stating that We Happy Few will be classified R18+ in Australia. That is Australia’s highest rating level, with the official word being that “the content is high in impact,” and specifically restricted to adults. Retailers may ask consumers to provide a proof of age document to purchase R18+ games in Australia.

We Happy Few’s R18+ rating will come with a content description noting that the game has “fantasy violence and interactive drug use.” The drug use appears to have been the sticking point in the Board’s original decision to refuse the game for classification. In its original ruling, the Board specifically mentioned the in-game drug, Joy, which players take throughout the game. In some parts of the game, taking the drug reduces the difficulty and makes the game appear more colourful and vibrant. The Board said “the game’s drug-use mechanic making game progression less difficult constitutes an incentive or reward for drug-use” and was therefore refused classification.

In its decision to overturn the ban, the Board said it determined We Happy Few’s drug use elements were actually “no greater than high.” The Board said it considered Australia’s Classification Act 1995, the National Classification Scheme, the National Classification Code, and the Guidelines for the Classification of Computer Games when making its decision to give We Happy Few a classification.

Bethesda’s Fallout 3 was banned in Australia due to its depiction of drug use as well.

We Happy Few is published by Borderlands studio Gearbox, which is the company that asked the Board to reconsider its ruling. Compulsion Games said in its own statement that it went through a “great deal of effort” to get the decision overturned. Another big part of this announcement is that Compulsion Games was not forced to modify We Happy Few to meet the Classification Board’s guidelines. That’s a big deal, as other big-name games like Call of Duty: WWII, Saints Row IV, and South Park: The Stick of Truth were all edited to make it through the classification process in Australia.

“We are extremely pleased with the decision of the board and excited that our Australian fans and new players will be able to experience We Happy Few without modification,” Compulsion Games said in a statement. “We want to thank everybody who got involved in the discussion, contacted the board and sent us countless messages of support. Your involvement made a huge difference.”

Compulsion producer Sam Abbott told Kotaku that the Board’s original decision to refuse We Happy Few for classification made sense based on the information it had to go on at time. He added that the studio could have done more to make sure it provided the right context for the drug-related scenarios in the game when submitting it for classification. Abbot went on to thank publisher Gearbox for its help with the appeal process as it relates to the advice it gave Compulsion and the money it provided for the effort to overturn the decision.

GameSpot has reached out to Compulsion in an attempt to get more details about this situation. Keep checking back for more.

We Happy Few has been announced for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. It was already playable on PC (and Xbox One) through Early Access, but in January when the game was delayed to summer 2018, Compulsion removed the ability to pre-buy the game.

The game is set in an alternate-history version of 1960s England in the fictional town of Wellington Wells. Players take on the role of characters who refuse to take their mind-altering happy pills and must find a way to escape from the town without being caught by its citizens.